Leave Your Conscience at the Tone

Renthead, Feminist, Adrenaline Junkie

Hummingbirds, Femslash, Politics

Soundtrack of my life: .
I Feel You

"I’ll never forget it. I’m sure I’ve been defined by it. I know I’ve been stamped by it.—I’m one of the luckiest people I know. This was a great, great, great opportunity and I just hope that I did the very best that I could." -KM

(via racethewind10)

tamorapierce:

doctorscienceknowsfandom:

anatsuno:

navalenigma:

shayvaalski:

friendlycloud:

agewa:

“We went to Kineshma, that’s in Ivanovo region, to visit his parents. I went as a heroine and I never expected someone to welcome me, a front-line girl, like that. We’ve gone through so much, we’ve saved lives, lifes of mothers, wives. And then… I heard accusations, I was bad-mouthed. Before that I’ve only ever been “dear sister”… We had tea and my husband’s mother took him aside and started crying: “Who did you marry? A front-line girl… You have two younger sisters. Who’s going to marry them now?” When I think back to that moment I feel tears welling up. Imagine: I had a record, I loved it a lot. There was a song, it said: you have the right to wear the best shoes. That was about a front-line girl. I had it playing, and [his?] elder sister came up and broke it apart, saying: you have no rights. They destroyed all my photos from the war… We, front-line girls, went through so much during hte war… and then we had another war. Another terrible war. The men left us, they didn’t cover our backs. Not like at the front.” from С.Алексеевич “У войны не женское лицо”

In Soviet Union women participating in WWII were erased from history, remaining as the occasional anecdote of a female sniper or simply as medical staff or, at best, radio specialists. The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn. 

This has always happened in history: Women do something important. Then they get shamed for it (so nobody will talk about it) and it gets erased from history.

And then certain men will say: “Women suck, they’ve never done anything important.”

Look into history and learn that women have played a far greater role then douches (present and past) wanted you to know.

Hey Will (and Jack) I got you something.

So this is important. Let me tell you a story.

All the time I spend debating about women in combat, I’ve picked up on a trend that disturbs me. Supporting or attacking, people are quick to draw on biology, psychology, law, but very rarely - almost never - do I hear about the history of women in combat, and the evidence their service lends to this debate.

Hundreds of thousands of women faced combat in WW2, and on both sides, and on all fronts, and it is a history that has been almost completely erased from contemporary awareness. I have been given arguments about how women can not psychologically handle combat. And about how women in mixed-gender combat units will automatically disrupt group cohesion - the brotherhood, if you will. Both of these assertions are erasure.

Women have not lived in a protective bubble untouched by combat for all of history. Women have been killed, wounded, and captured in combat, and tortured after. We are not living a world where these are hypothetical situations women have yet to prove they can handle. Unfortunately, they have, they can, in the future, they probably will, again and again. Soviet women served as partisans, snipers, tank drivers, fighter pilots, bombers. And more.

Both British and American women served in mixed-gender AA units. I could drag you through several examples of British women performing exemplarily despite being wounded, or seeing their comrades die. The Luftwaffe did not discriminate. Between the British and the Americans, it was determined that mixed gender units actually performed much better than all male units, because of teamwork. Because women are better and certain tasks, men are better at certain tasks, and at other tasks they are comparably efficient, and in a team, hopefully, in combat, you let the best do what they are best at. For the most part, they were proud to serve together. 

German propaganda never commented on the British AA units, but they thoroughly smeared the Soviet fighting woman - flitenweiber. People often argue with me that women are a threat to group cohesion because men naturally give women preferential treatment. Which certainly explains why men are more likely to survive shipwrecks. And history shows us that Germans soldiers had no chivalrous compunction when it came to shooting captured Soviet women who were armed.

We’re fed a history of war that almost exclusively features white male figures, most of whom fit into this destructive constructed myth of the soldier that is somehow both chivalrous and charmingly womanizing and who’s sense of brotherhood is unshakably dependent on the band being all man. There is no history of woman at war, none. I hear a lot about how women have no upper body strength, I hear nothing about the Front-Line Female Comrade.

THE WORD FRONTOVICHKA BECAME A TERRIBLE INSULT - are you fucking kidding me? Fuck, that made me cry. At first when I started reading I thought I was reading alernate history fiction. I’m ashamed to be ignorant about this, and full of rage and much worse bitter shame that this history is constantly repressed, suppressed, hidden. WHAT THE FUCK. D: D: D:

I didn’t know that bit about the AA (Anti-Aircraft) units.

And even in this article I don’t see a mention of the women of the Israeli Army, or women of the resistance if we’re just sticking to WWII.  I didn’t know about the Russian soldiers, only the fighter pilots, the night witches, and I’ve spent years poking into the corners of history trying to find women who will serve as ammunition when men tell me women can’t fight. 

The best explanation I’ve heard of what happened to women after WWII comes from “A League of Their Own,” the publicist’s character: “What is this—the war is over, Rosie, turn in your rivets?”  Women all over the world had to step into the same old ruts.

I don’t think it’s any mistake at all that Betty Friedan wrote her ground-breaking text for the second wave of feminism, THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE, just 10 years after WWII, after women had dined on a full plate of the same old, same old.

And shame on the men who never stood up for the women who worked and fought beside them, and saved their lives.

(via professor-zun)

racethewind10:

Because we haven’t had a RTFM post in a while. 

"Playing a drug addict was challenging, especially since it was an alien drug. I spent a lot of time talking with Kevin Murphy (the show’s creator) and Michael Nankin (the episode’s director) about the physicality of a person addicted to Adreno. Once we were clear on that, I started watching videos of people high on drugs, specifically opiates. All the videos were very graphic, it gave me direction to play Amanda, although it also left me feeling very raw." -Julie Benz

(via maiagaru)

booklandreeve:

There are people who don’t know about fandom.

There are people who think you just watch a show and that’s it.

Those people frighten me a bit.

(via racethewind10)

hiseyeslikesky:

Lana Parrrilla
total perfection

hiseyeslikesky:

Lana Parrrilla

total perfection

(via racethewind10)

(via elfjet)

amodernmanifesto:

For all the liberals saying that the shit in Ferguson is going off because the police are so militarised, you have it backwards.

The police are so militarised because the American ruling class has been preparing for shit like this.

They are arming themselves for a civil war, because they know that people can only take so much exploitation and violence before they rise up.

(via yangarangxl)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Top three shows you wish more people watched? I like so many of the shows you blog and I want new ones.
menzosarres menzosarres Said:

Ooh! I really like this ask! And I immediately had an answer, so even though I’ve thought of a few more great shows since, I’m sticking with my original three. 

3. Defiance (x)

Defiance is a Syfy show with all the usual trappings; a pseudo post-apocalyptic world, aliens and spacecrafts and tech (oh my!), and even the usual middle aged white male lead. However, it also has a better-than-average premise, including an interesting look at a failed colonialism with Americans on the receiving end, for once, a lot of interesting explorations of culture and race and tradition, and all the diversity you’ve been dying for on the last ten Syfy shows you watched. For everyone who has been complaining about how our media is willing to imagine an entirely new future but can’t imagine one where sexuality isn’t a huge problem, this show has finally done it. There’s a healthy helping of bi representation in a positive light, as well as lots of lady loving (involving Jaimie Murray, and you really can’t go wrong there). Beyond that, the show is decently racially diverse, and has even started exploring mental illness, all while the plot just keeps surprising me with how not-terrible it is. Is the show perfect? Hell nah, but the cast is brilliant, the premise is good, and it’s worth your time to catch up.

2. Wentworth (x)

Some of tumblr has already happened across this show in the lull following Orange is the New Black, as it promised to fill the lady-loving-ladies-in-prison niche everyone was stuck in. I know that’s how I found it. However, I stayed for better reasons than just everyone’s favorite prisoner-governor relationship. Where OitNB is funny, lighthearted, and amusingly gritty, Wentworth is dark, raw, and dangerous, but I think all the better for it. As much as I love OitNB, there’s more than a touch of unfortunate romanticizing that pushes some bad buttons. Sure, Alex Vause is a hottie, but too many people are walking away thinking “damn, dealing heroin is sexy.” It’s the age-old adage: tragic backstories can explain characters’ actions, but they don’t excuse them. And Wentworth does it right. These women are in maximum security and they are there for a reason, so even as you grow to love them, flaws and all, no one leaves thinking being an alcoholic parent and nearly running over your child is something admirable. Also, for everyone out there who has insisted that it’s time for a lesbian villain: a villain who’s villainy has nothing to do with her sexuality, well, let’s just say season two comes very close to offering this, and in quite a powerful way. 

1. Les Revenants or The Returned (x)

There are only eight episodes to catch up on for this one, so you have no excuse not to have watched it. Unless you can’t stand subtitles, in which case I’ll give you a pass. This French thriller is definitely the most unique take on the undead I’ve happened across, and don’t let that word deter you. No zombies here, just the eerie, too-small setting of a small mountain town unsure how to react when people they believed long dead start turning up again, perfectly healthy but untouched by the time that has passed. This show has all the delicious European grittiness that polished American shows lack, and the sheer human reality is almost painful to watch. It’s incredible. Also, there is a particularly heartbreaking pair of ladies to root for and cry over, and a season one cliffhanger that continues to eat away at my soul to this day. Run, do not walk, to this show.

So. That’s my picks. Not that there aren’t many, many more amazing shows out there, but these three are particularly delicious and in desperate need of a bigger fandom backing here on tumblr. Each (x) will link to the episodes, though I strongly recommend adblock. If you need a new fix of something where the femslash is canon and the plot is worth chewing on, pick one of these, and bon appetite! 


30-Day Helen McCrory Challenge↳ by toujoursaufonddemoi  → Day 27
What do you consider to be Helen’s best feature?Her face.

30-Day Helen McCrory Challenge
↳ by toujoursaufonddemoi  → Day 27

What do you consider to be Helen’s best feature?
Her face.

(via kitteninthesky12)

cross-connect:

Featured Curator: Justin Ruckman

The artist and painter Eduardo Rodriguez Calzado describes himself as being obsessed with detail, “expressing emotions through the fragmentation of color”. While the human form or elements of human consciousness are often represented in his pieces, he also enjoys starting with more abstract gestures and colors, and letting the narrative unfold organically.

(via bluerosesinwonderland)

sqaw ; [2/7] favourite moment → sq trolling storybrooke

(via strangesmallbard)